Offroad Trailblazers and Envoys

First Aid/ Medical Kit

Discussion on how to enjoy the outdoors.

by HARDTRAILZ » Mon May 17, 2010 2:28 pm

We all should probably be sporting one of these and those that have one, can always upgrade/replenish/ or exchange out of date stuff, so i was hoping to get some discussion on where to buy items at decent prices. Is it better to just get a box and make a list and fill it or is it better to buy a kit and add what fits for your needs?

I am under-equipped in this area as I keep some compression packs, gauze, some basic meds...pain, cold, upset stomach..., bandaids and medicated ointment. I do know that is not much for what could happen.

Anyone want to share what they have, or wish they ahd and where to get things for good prices?
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by Trail X » Mon May 17, 2010 3:35 pm

I've got a lot of my stuff at REI and from my old Rescue Squad.

I've got one box worth of stuff. It includes a small "survival" kit.

I don't recall everything in there, but right now there's a full IV kit, a SAM splint, gauze of various sizes, bandaids of various sizes, various medicines, whistle, compass, signal mirror, glow sticks, etc etc. There's always more that could be added, but I'm at the max amount that I can carry in my current container... I'd have to get a new container to carry more stuff.
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by HARDTRAILZ » Mon May 17, 2010 6:57 pm

Splint and IV are good ideas. Would not do an IV myself unless life or death, but could be good to have if med person is around.
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by KE7WOX » Mon May 17, 2010 7:16 pm

There's one thing that i think it's not common. A snake bite kit. I'm actually going to get one as soon as possible (and I have a pending trip to REI... next time I go down to Phoenix). I'm not sure to what extent it would be needed/used here, but last time I did serious camping (community service, 1 week trip) we were at least 2 hours away from the nearest clinic, and at least another 1.5-2 from a good hospital, and one of my friends managed to get a good kit (which I believe included some sort of serum / solution to at least give you time to get to the nearest hospital). And granted, one of the deadliest snakes in the Panamanian mountains is what they call the "X", and if you don't get medical attention after getting bitten, you will bleed out of every orifice of your body (penis included) and suffer a slow and painful death unless you get some form of treatment.

And i'd say it might be easier to get a kit, unless there's a chance of getting water into your vehicle, in that case you'd be better off with a Pelican case or something similar. And have it clearly marked.
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by cbbryan » Mon May 17, 2010 11:57 pm

It depends on what you are trained to do; essentially you shouldn't carry equipment for things you aren't trained to use. What is your level of first aid?
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by HARDTRAILZ » Tue May 18, 2010 8:43 am

I have taken several classes, but it has been a couple years. First and and cpr both. I have way too much first hand knowledge from helping my mom after my brothers 3 kidney transplants. She had 3 years of nurse training, but hated blood, so she quit. Then had to donate a kidney to my brother and do dialysis, growth hormones, feeding tubes, colostomy stuff... So I always helped as much as possible. I learned a lot by just paying attention and trying to grasp what was going on with him.

I understand not wanting things beyond your knowledge, but if its life and death...I would rather someone take a chance and try if they had the stuff. Also I have several nurse and military friends that have more knowledge than me and would like to be able to enable them to use their knowledge.

I dont want a doctors kit, but trauma/stabilazation kit and basics that may have multiple uses.
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by The Roadie » Tue May 18, 2010 9:53 am

I've got a small kit on the center divider of the rear seat unit:

Image

and a larger collection in an orange Pelican:

Image

Image

And a couple packs of the Celox coagulant powder always within reach while I'm driving - one in the center console and one in a pocket of the vest I usually wear.

http://www.remotemedical.com/CELOX-Hemo ... ulent-15gm

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by Trail X » Tue May 18, 2010 10:21 am

I've got a couple packs of that stuff, but it's a last line sorta thing... why is it within reach? I guess in case you go over a cliff and are trapped? I've heard the quick-clot stuff is really painful to use.
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by bartonmd » Tue May 18, 2010 10:39 am

From the OS:

the roadie wrote:
And a couple packs of the Celox coagulant powder always within reach while I'm driving - one in the center console and one in a pocket of the vest I usually wear.

http://www.remotemedical.com/CELOX-Hemostat-Blood-Coagulent-15gm

Image


Good you mentioned this, Bill!

See how Bill's says "No heat generated in use" ??

That's because Quick-Clot generates a ton of heat in use, and while it works for life threatening stuff, it causes pretty severe burns, and shouldn't be used if you're not ABOUT TO DIE... Big thread on them in the Team section of ARFCOM sometime last year...

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by aaronrules » Tue May 18, 2010 12:59 pm

bartonmd wrote:From the OS:

the roadie wrote:
And a couple packs of the Celox coagulant powder always within reach while I'm driving - one in the center console and one in a pocket of the vest I usually wear.

http://www.remotemedical.com/CELOX-Hemostat-Blood-Coagulent-15gm

Image


Good you mentioned this, Bill!

See how Bill's says "No heat generated in use" ??

That's because Quick-Clot generates a ton of heat in use, and while it works for life threatening stuff, it causes pretty severe burns, and shouldn't be used if you're not ABOUT TO DIE... Big thread on them in the Team section of ARFCOM sometime last year...

Mike


In the military, in our self aid/buddy care class they tell to use quick clot only in the last resort after a tourniquet thing. Use instructions include taking a deep breath and holding it while applying the stuff...It stops bleeding pretty good I guess, but can also do a good bit of harm too.
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by KE7WOX » Tue May 18, 2010 2:49 pm

I've taken first aid and CPR. This was back in early 09, so quite recent.

I totally understand not carrying stuff you're not trained to use, but as a last resort, it's useful, and I'd give it a try to survive. I mean several people have self-amputated limbs as a last resort (trapped under boulders and similar) without training (or with a little bit of it).
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by cbbryan » Tue May 18, 2010 9:10 pm

An easy place to look for a fairly decent kit is GALLS. http://www.galls.com/google/easearchresult.html?question=Medical%20Kits&searchaction=1&path=All%20Products%2F%2F%2F%2FUserSearch%3DAll%20Products%20%3B%3B%20Venture_id%3D503185%2F%2F%2F%2FMedical%20Supplies&resultsperpage=20 Anything here shouldn't be beyond the basic first responder skill set. Unless you are really close with some medical professionals I doubt you'll be able to get IV bags, starter kits, and needles because you have to have a prescription for the fluids. Not to mention that it is illegal in some places to posses such items if you are not trained as National Registry EMT- Intermediate or higher (Paramedic, Nurse, Dr., or military). I carry bags I got from the guard, but what I have I wouldn't use on anyone but myself or close friends in order to avoid any legal issues.
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by The Roadie » Wed May 19, 2010 12:31 am

JamesDowning wrote:.. why is it within reach? I guess in case you go over a cliff and are trapped?
Exactly. To slap on a leg to keep you from bleeding to death if you're solo while the SPOT beacon that's also within reach at all times calls for SAR. I worry too much, but Teebes and I also LOST THE TRUCKS on a 1/2 mile hike, and didn't think that was possible.
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by Regulator1175 » Wed May 19, 2010 11:57 pm

aaronrules wrote:
bartonmd wrote:
Good you mentioned this, Bill!

See how Bill's says "No heat generated in use" ??

That's because Quick-Clot generates a ton of heat in use, and while it works for life threatening stuff, it causes pretty severe burns, and shouldn't be used if you're not ABOUT TO DIE... Big thread on them in the Team section of ARFCOM sometime last year...

Mike


In the military, in our self aid/buddy care class they tell to use quick clot only in the last resort after a tourniquet thing. Use instructions include taking a deep breath and holding it while applying the stuff...It stops bleeding pretty good I guess, but can also do a good bit of harm too.


They are both exactly correct. This stuff is DANGEROUS. I really wouldn't suggest you carrying it on you for any reason. I would look at there being to much of a chance to puncture the packaging. Like Aaron stated, this is meant as a last case, after using a tourniquet and the limb is still bleeding. With a tourniquet you have already accepted the loss of the limb, but this stuff can make things a whole lot worse.

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by irishboy02 » Thu May 20, 2010 8:47 am

Quik clot is intimidating just to look at. We carry a bag in each of our cars at work. We are intrsucted how to use them but its stressed as worst case scenario. So far out of 4 life threatening shootings it was taken out of the car only once by my srgt but he didnt even use it.

Not for nothing but i dnt recommend a civilian to carry this unless your certifiably EMT trained cause this stuff esp if not used correctly can just make the situation worse
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by KE7WOX » Thu May 20, 2010 3:28 pm

I'm confused tho. Is Celox the same as Quick-Clot? or a less dangerous one?
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by OregTrailBlazin » Wed Jun 02, 2010 6:02 pm

I carry all the basic first aid stuff, with an added suture kit, and a couple scalpels. I do carry a snake bite kit, and another important one, bee sting kit!!.. I have some quick-clot I keep in a small container in my hiking/mining bag for that "just incase" situation when I'm 10-20 miles from even a dirt road... I haven't stitched myself, but I have been able to practice on a few pigs, and would not hesitate to do it to myself or close friend. But as everyone has stated, if your not nationally certified its a good way to get sued!!
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by lil_freak_66 » Sun Jun 06, 2010 4:46 pm

most of my stuff is meant to treat major trauma,no pics of it all though.

most of it is military surplus,its cheap,readily available and reliable.

tourniquets,coagulant,butterfly bandages of varying sizes,gauze,medical wrap,thread and needle,latex free rubber gloves,sterile water,disinfectant,high power pain killers,splints and gun powder.

yes i said gun powder,it has deep roots as a military medical remedy
http://www.homeoint.org/seror/clarkgun/index.htm

also serves as a quick,yet crude way to stop the bleeding in a large wound quickly,various military forces used to practice that,i am unsure if any still do,but i would not be surprised if african,middle east or asian miltary forces teach it still.

i also carry a little cheapo walmart thing with some band aids and all that.
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by DirtyBacon04 » Tue Aug 23, 2011 1:44 am

JamesDowning wrote: I've heard the quick-clot stuff is really painful to use.


This much is very true. Unexplainable excruciating burning pain. Feels like taking a sharp hot cattle prod to where ever...
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by Blackout » Tue Aug 23, 2011 1:19 pm

It works though. Careful not to get the powder in your eyes and only use the bandage type as a last resort because they have to be surgically removed
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