Offroad Trailblazers and Envoys

Camping Secrets

Discussion on how to enjoy the outdoors.

by navigator » Fri Oct 14, 2011 1:23 pm

NC_IslandRunner wrote: :awesome: Excuse me for a minute I need to light that fire in my driveway!


yeah, I wasn't with them, they were younger kids/early teens from our church, camping out on their own, likely for their first time.
They didn't get too far off the road!
I guess the figured the camp fire wouldn't spread too bad on the concrete pad.
I'm sure they have seen folks use rocks to make a fire ring with.
"Please consider a search before posting. Folks on this site PIONEERED functional offroad use of these trucks."
The answer to many common lift questions can be found
here
My Build Thread
User avatar
navigator
Moderator
 
Posts: 4649
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:16 am
Location: NC, Winnabow
Name: Chris
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Trail Ready

by OregTrailBlazin » Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:22 pm

RICHIET wrote:Take the rock and wrap it in a t shirt or a towel and put it in the foot of your sleeping bag. Remember, too hot and it might melt the bag, use your judgment. That rock will heat up your bag all night long.

:thumleft: Great tips..
When on winter river trips, I heat a bunch, then burry them in the sand under my tent, it will hold heat all night..


RICHIET wrote:Don't use river rock. the moisture in the rock will crack the rock at best, explode at worse.

Amazing how many people do not know this very important thing.... Don't build fire rings with Round river rock!!

Saxis wrote:I have an old tent that I use as a camp sauna. I always set it up next to a good swimming hole on the river. Dig a hole in the ground, the tent has a hole in the bottom that you set over it. Heat up some good sized rocks for a few hours until they are glowing red. Use a shovel to transfer the rocks to the hole in the tent. Throw a tarp over to help keep the heat in. Grab a bucket of water to drizzle over the rocks. Cook yourself until you can't stand it anymore, then jump into the river. Cleans the pores, makes for a good camp bath and I usually sleep like a baby.


We do the same thing on the river trips, except with our oars and Tarps.. An extra tent with a hole in the bottom would be awesome, with allot less setup time.. Might have to get a new one, and use my old one for it! :D
Johnny Kurz
General Manager
541-474-2879
Wheeler's Off-Road Inc.
Our Vendor Section
User avatar
OregTrailBlazin
Off-Road Vendor
 
Posts: 610
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 2:34 pm
Location: OR, Grants Pass
Name: Johnathan Kurz
Vehicle Year: 2004
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD

by tightlines_02TB » Tue Oct 18, 2011 8:18 pm

I like to camp the same way I backpack....light. So this is what I carry/load, it's pretty much the same stuff for a 3-4day weekend, or week long outings.

1. Sleeping Bag (always add 15-20deg to what the bag says it is rated for, this is where you will actually sleep comfortably)
2. Camp stove (light, compact, and the fuel lasts forever)
3. Mountain House freeze dried meals (no mess, less space and they taste amazing)
4. Sleeping pads (not necessary but nice to have.)
5. Tent (I have a NEMOequipment tent that I can setup from inside, and it has no poles) get one that is the best based on your budget
6. Lighter (matches can get wet, small and compact)
7. Water filter or steripen
8. Weapon (if you camp where you need one)
9. Bear Spray (works on humans too)
10. flyrod (if you fish this way, 4pc or smaller)
11. Trail pants (light compact)
12. Military style shovel/trowel for digging out fire rings, or burying your number 2.
13. Rope (polycord is good)
13. How to shit in the woods book (entertaining when your wife/girlfriend reads it)

That is my must pack list.
Other ideas were covered already like warming up rocks for heat.
tightlines_02TB
Newbie
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 6:32 pm
Name: Dustin
Vehicle Year: 2002
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD

by navigator » Tue Nov 15, 2011 4:00 pm

this might be something obvious but something I tried on our recent camping trip I used a fluorescent "90 watt" flood light bulb in one of those clamp lights. I connected it via my power inverter to my aux battery. I think it is actually 26W. I used it for a couple hours and when I got home and put my battery on the charger it was still at 95%. Looking back I could have run it on the TB battery for many hrs without worry of draining it too much. I might experiment hooking it up for 4-5 hrs just for kicks to make sure the TB will start with no issues.

It isn't the ideal light for all circumstances but for the right situations it was very nice. I used it pointing at the picnic table when we were cooking etc and it gave indirect light to most of the campsite and kept me from burning the Coleman lantern very much.

I expect one or two clamped on the back of my roof rack would work great for fishing etc until I get the LED lights I want.
"Please consider a search before posting. Folks on this site PIONEERED functional offroad use of these trucks."
The answer to many common lift questions can be found
here
My Build Thread
User avatar
navigator
Moderator
 
Posts: 4649
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:16 am
Location: NC, Winnabow
Name: Chris
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Trail Ready

by djthumper » Tue Nov 15, 2011 5:38 pm

navigator wrote:this might be something obvious but something I tried on our recent camping trip I used a fluorescent "90 watt" flood light bulb in one of those clamp lights. I connected it via my power inverter to my aux battery. I think it is actually 26W. I used it for a couple hours and when I got home and put my battery on the charger it was still at 95%. Looking back I could have run it on the TB battery for many hrs without worry of draining it too much. I might experiment hooking it up for 4-5 hrs just for kicks to make sure the TB will start with no issues.

It isn't the ideal light for all circumstances but for the right situations it was very nice. I used it pointing at the picnic table when we were cooking etc and it gave indirect light to most of the campsite and kept me from burning the Coleman lantern very much.

I expect one or two clamped on the back of my roof rack would work great for fishing etc until I get the LED lights I want.


Or you could get the LED lamps from HF... http://www.harborfreight.com/45-bulb-led-work-light-66308.html http://www.harborfreight.com/110-volt-3-watt-28-led-work-light-66274.html
User avatar
djthumper
Moderator
 
Posts: 2677
Joined: Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:04 pm
Location: NV, Las Vegas
Name: Larry
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Offroad Rated

by madmanvillain » Tue Nov 15, 2011 6:18 pm

In regards to the rocks at the bottom of the sleeping bag, me and my father figured out that if you boil a couple quarts of water and fill your water bottles up and put them at the bottom of your bag they serve dual purpose. well triple now, with the whole cancer thing...... :wallbash:
madmanvillain
Off-Roader
 
Posts: 153
Joined: Thu Jan 28, 2010 9:08 pm
Name: mmv
Vehicle Year: Other
Vehicle: Other Vehicle
DriveTrain: 4WD

by v7guy » Mon Dec 19, 2011 4:50 am

so taking a crap and having a piss. crapping in the woods isn't my favorite thing, but it is what it is. As I've talked with the misses more, going to the bathroom outdoors is probably the biggest deterrent to camping/outdoors/leaving the city.

So I've been reading a lot about camping and toiletries. It's one of the biggest obstacles to get getting a woman out for a weekend. I never imagined such a thing existed but there are devices to let the misses pee standing up... pretty strange http://www.go-girl.com/ its small and the reviews are good. There are some option that are a bit better overall (according to the reviews) but they are a lot bigger.

I've also happened upon the travel john http://www.traveljohn.com/ and people are generally very happy with it. There are a lot of options to choose from product wise. It's unisex and absorbs liquid.

This probably isn't the most popular topic, but it is one of the most important. I don't want to kill a great thread with practicality but does anybody have any secrets they'd like to share?
build thread

All things in moderation, including moderation.
Some people never go crazy... what truly horrible lives they must lead
User avatar
v7guy
Moderator
 
Posts: 3710
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:17 pm
Location: NY, long island
Name: Jason
Vehicle Year: 2004
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Offroad Rated

by Trail X » Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:41 am

Before I got my pett toilet, my trick was to grab a ratchet strap from the truck.

Loosen the strap as much as possible, making it long... at least 8 feet is needed.

Find a good tree, not too big, and preferably leaning over a bit toward you.

Loop the strap around the tree at about eye level, and under your arm pits (you can even thread the strap through your TP roll).

Lean back, put your feet against the tree base, and do your business.

Much easier than squatting.
8-) Build Thread | ExPo Build | YouTube Videos
Not all who wander are lost. -Tolkien
User avatar
Trail X
Founder
 
Posts: 9861
Joined: Mon Sep 07, 2009 10:22 pm
Location: VA, Roanoke
Name: James Downing
Vehicle Year: 2005
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD w/ Aftermarket Locker
Rank: Expedition Guide

by bartonmd » Mon Dec 19, 2011 10:53 am

v7guy wrote:so taking a crap and having a piss. crapping in the woods isn't my favorite thing, but it is what it is. As I've talked with the misses more, going to the bathroom outdoors is probably the biggest deterrent to camping/outdoors/leaving the city.

So I've been reading a lot about camping and toiletries. It's one of the biggest obstacles to get getting a woman out for a weekend. I never imagined such a thing existed but there are devices to let the misses pee standing up... pretty strange http://www.go-girl.com/ its small and the reviews are good. There are some option that are a bit better overall (according to the reviews) but they are a lot bigger.

I've also happened upon the travel john http://www.traveljohn.com/ and people are generally very happy with it. There are a lot of options to choose from product wise. It's unisex and absorbs liquid.

This probably isn't the most popular topic, but it is one of the most important. I don't want to kill a great thread with practicality but does anybody have any secrets they'd like to share?


Walmart $25 toilet (the one with legs) with the chemical ziplock bags that go in it... If she doesn't like the "outside" part, there are $36 "privacy" shower/lavatory bottomless tent-looking things...

Mike
bartonmd
Contributing Author & Off-Road Vendor
 
Posts: 4466
Joined: Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:35 am
Location: IN, Indianapolis
Name: Mike
Vehicle Year: 2007
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD w/ G80
Rank: Offroad Rated

by cbbryan » Wed Jan 18, 2012 4:37 pm

Take your standard issue E-tool or equivalent with you when nature calls. First you dig a hole then you adjust it so that the blade is perpendicular to the handle and tighten it back down. Then you place the handle to either side of the hole and sit on the blade with one cheek. Then the poop goes down the hole! Then you cover it with dirt and charlie mike.

It's surprisingly comfortable and balanced.
User avatar
cbbryan
Trail-Blazer
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:26 pm
Location: MS, Amory
Name: Chris
Vehicle Year: 2005
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD

by cbbryan » Wed Jan 18, 2012 4:50 pm

This may help explain better:

User avatar
cbbryan
Trail-Blazer
 
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Sep 22, 2009 2:26 pm
Location: MS, Amory
Name: Chris
Vehicle Year: 2005
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD

by navigator » Wed Jan 18, 2012 5:04 pm

man, this is getting low but it is good information
I don't mind squatting too bad.
I always take one leg out of my shorts and move my shorts it out of the way.

I know this is way too much information but I read some info one time that our bodies are actually designed to go that way. Something to the effect of 3rd world countries don't have the issues with appendicitis we do because the motion of squatting cleans out the appendix or something like that. They also have less occurrence of hemorrhoids and other issues related to straining etc.
"Please consider a search before posting. Folks on this site PIONEERED functional offroad use of these trucks."
The answer to many common lift questions can be found
here
My Build Thread
User avatar
navigator
Moderator
 
Posts: 4649
Joined: Wed Mar 09, 2011 10:16 am
Location: NC, Winnabow
Name: Chris
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Trail Ready

by Mooseknuckle » Tue Feb 21, 2012 11:30 pm

Lighter or matches in a ziplock
Flashlight extra batteries
E-tool angle it to 90 degrees dig a small hole put one ass check like the dude in the video and poop like a champ into your hole. wet naps are very nice
MRE's
first aid kit
parka and rope for a lean two, great in a pinch
good sleeping bag
food box and keep it about 25-30 feet away from you so you don't wake up to a huge surprise
lots of water
100 mile an hour tape and some rope
comfortable hiking boots something waterproof is good
air horn get them at boat supply stores good for scaring the shit outta something unwanted also bear pepper spray I just have mase
fishing line and bells are ok
100% deet mosquito coils are good too.
I usually have my dog with me he is a good indicator something is around
Firearm of choice and plenty of ammo
compass
clean socks
machete and I usually have knives on me at all times
I don't dial 911
Mooseknuckle
Addict
 
Posts: 708
Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 9:31 am
Location: NJ,Brick
Name: Jeff
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Offroad Rated

by DirtyBacon04 » Wed Feb 22, 2012 12:35 am

I was going to post a reply but decided to start a new thread on the topic

viewtopic.php?f=59&t=2910
Trans-Continental Trailblazer - 5th Award
***The more you know, the less you need.***
Sergeant, USMC
Dirty Bacon's Build
User avatar
DirtyBacon04
Moderator
 
Posts: 2971
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:59 am
Location: FL, Central
Name: Michael
Vehicle Year: 2004
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD w/ Aftermarket Locker
Rank: Expedition Rated

by Beamer » Sun May 13, 2012 1:04 am

My cheap toilet solution:
Obtain a 5 gallon bucket with lid (Lowes $5), the cheapest fake wooden toilet seat (WalMart $5) and some 3/4" wood screws.
Remove hinges and lid from toilet seat and throw them away.
Center the toilet seat on the bucket lid, trace the seat hole onto the lid and cut out this hole from the lid.
Attach lid to the underside of the toilet seat with screws thru the remaining flat part of the lid (where hole was just cut from) into bottom of toilet seat.
Snap lid onto bucket (I cut away most of the bucket lid locking rim and only left 4-2" tabs for easier removal).
Put a standard 13 gallon plastic kitchen trash bag through the seat and down into the bucket, pull the opening of the bag out and down over the toilet seat (just like putting a bag in a trash can).
You actually sit on the bag and the bucket/toilet seat never gets dirty. A whole kitchen trash bag for 1 crap seems like a waste except when you look at the price of a box of kitchen trash bags vs camping toilet bags.
I pack lighter fluid, torch, flashlight and other items in the bucket so it essentially doesn't waste space when packing to go camping.
You can always remove the seat/lid and there are many uses for a 5 gallon bucket while camping...
User avatar
Beamer
Member
 
Posts: 82
Joined: Wed May 18, 2011 9:33 pm
Location: MD, Westminster
Name: Chris Beam
Vehicle Year: 2003
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD w/ G80
Rank: Trail Ready

by Rob93 » Sun May 13, 2012 9:20 pm

Beamer wrote:My cheap toilet solution:
Obtain a 5 gallon bucket with lid (Lowes $5), the cheapest fake wooden toilet seat (WalMart $5) and some 3/4" wood screws.
Remove hinges and lid from toilet seat and throw them away.
Center the toilet seat on the bucket lid, trace the seat hole onto the lid and cut out this hole from the lid.
Attach lid to the underside of the toilet seat with screws thru the remaining flat part of the lid (where hole was just cut from) into bottom of toilet seat.
Snap lid onto bucket (I cut away most of the bucket lid locking rim and only left 4-2" tabs for easier removal).
Put a standard 13 gallon plastic kitchen trash bag through the seat and down into the bucket, pull the opening of the bag out and down over the toilet seat (just like putting a bag in a trash can).
You actually sit on the bag and the bucket/toilet seat never gets dirty. A whole kitchen trash bag for 1 crap seems like a waste except when you look at the price of a box of kitchen trash bags vs camping toilet bags.
I pack lighter fluid, torch, flashlight and other items in the bucket so it essentially doesn't waste space when packing to go camping.
You can always remove the seat/lid and there are many uses for a 5 gallon bucket while camping...


Although the bucket was lined with a bag, I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable using that bucket for much else...
Good idea though I may try that
Rob93
Trail-Blazer
 
Posts: 276
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 5:52 pm
Location: FL, Ft. Lauderdale
Name: Rob
Vehicle Year: 2006
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 2WD

by Badgerfan1181 » Sun May 13, 2012 11:25 pm

Instead of dropping the cash on a "privacy tent" look for a cheap groundblind in the offseason you can find one for 20 bucks, it already doesnt have a bottom, most of them don't have poles,and most are designed to be put up and taken down daily
Badgerfan1181
Cruiser
 
Posts: 48
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:02 pm
Location: WI, Janesville
Name: Ben
Vehicle Year: 2003
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD

by RICHIET » Thu May 17, 2012 8:38 pm

Boy, this thread has really gone down the toilet so to speak. Anyway, here's another solution. Bucket or hole, your choice.


Image

Image

It even comes with a seatbelt for those long family drives when you don't want to pull over every hour for a bathroom break. Image
RICHIET
Cruiser
 
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 5:39 pm
Location: NY, New Rochelle
Name: Richie
Vehicle Year: 2005
Vehicle: Chevrolet Trailblazer EXT
DriveTrain: 4WD w/ G80

by _HeadOfTheBeast_ » Mon Sep 16, 2013 4:24 am

Mooseknuckle wrote:Lighter or matches in a ziplock

The solid Bic lighters are the best as opposed to the clear ones. You can completely submerge them and they will still work. It may take a little bit to dry out, but chances are it will work again.

Take a jacket (or two) regardless of the season. If something goes wrong and you get stranded, you need to be able to keep warm if you can't build a fire for some reason (nothing like wet wood).

Know the wildlife in your area and plan accordingly. If you are going to carry a firearm, carry the right caliber. Don't go shooting at a bear with a .22. He may have been going to hurt you before he definitely is now. Take care of food accordingly.

Situational awareness is very important. Not everybody that you run in to in the woods is just out for a relaxing trip.

Be sure you have extra socks, water, and fire starting supplies. These are going to be the three most important things if you need to get out on your own power.

Always carry a mirror or other small reflective device. If you get stranded you can use this to get the attention of passing aircraft etc

Carry rope. It doesn't have to be anything huge, but you never know when you will need it.
User avatar
_HeadOfTheBeast_
Cruiser
 
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2013 5:07 am
Location: ID, Post Falls
Name: Dave
Vehicle Year: 2004
Vehicle: Chevrolet TrailBlazer
DriveTrain: 4WD
Rank: Trail Ready

Previous

Return to Camping / Survival